Pokemon Go! has full access to your data

According to Art’s Technica (a site that passes the C.R.A.P test) consistently, the newest craze Pokemon Go! on iOS has FULL access to your personal data. You might not care, which means you don’t yet see your privacy and data as currency which it now is. Your data is more than likely to be bought and sold.

Blogger Adam Reeve picked this up, saying

Let me be clear – Pokemon Go and Niantic can now:

  • Read all your email
  • Send email as you
  • Access all your Google drive documents (including deleting them)
  • Look at your search history and your Maps navigation history
  • Access any private photos you may store in Google Photos
  • And a whole lot more

There is a lot more ‘scare’ going on too – as hack-journalists bang on about people walking into the road without being aware of their surroundings and of course the ‘potential’ of malware and viruses hitting your device. This media ’rounding off’ behavior is nothing new and commonly applied as top and tail puff pieces to pad out the word count about games in mainstream media *cough, so I wouldn’t pay much attention to that.

However, privacy is an issue for schools and those using Google apps as their back-bone are ‘potentially’ at risk, but the wider concern is that the ongoing happy clapping over Google products will see this issue ignored completely and resigned to being an ‘at home’ problem, well outside of school. But of course it’s not – Google is a brand and it’s been shown in research that they don’t see a dividing line between Google school and home.

Next term, I’m looking at AR and VR with students and we will in fact be playing Ingress (made by the same company) and one of the main reasons we’re doing this it to think carefully about the future of information that we will supply and collide with in the ‘natural’ environment. Pokemon Go! makes for a nice discussion for me – because while people are out hunting down Pokemons, there are some very big servers collecting your information – whether by accident or not – they are not going to tell you.

Forget the tool, grab the data!

Thanks to @Kerryank for this image!

While there is a galaxy of cool tools, the real issue for many students lies in critical thinking — dealing with too much information. If you think of a brick wall – to computer types, this is what information looks like. The bricks themselves are elements of data. They can be use to create WALLS or PATHWAYS, be built in many ways with many patterns and even accommodate bricks or other object that don’t fit the pattern. We like pathways.

Teachers are not in the business of making bricks, so much as building walls or laying pathways with bricks. Digital illiterates rely on having their bricks delivered (or demanding a brick-layer do it for them), but you and I don’t. We don’t have to rely on books, manuals and provided content anymore — I have you and you have everyone.

I see students given information or making information with ICT — unit outlines, reading lists, powerpoints etc. It is very rare to see teachers use these tools to create data-sets that students can use authentically. Give them the data, then build activities around it. Tools looking for a purpose (“Wow, I really wanna use FabboPics next week!”) is bad, bad, bad.

This weekend I posted a simple message to Twitter (the social network). I wrote I wonder how far a Tweet can go? – using a data-reference point #howfarcanatweetgo and asked people to RT (re-tweet) to their networks. My networks is modest at about a thousand or so — and many of them are marketing-bots. Over the 2 days, the Tweet left my network and bounced around the planet, being repeated X times. It followed Y patterns and was re-tweeted with changes to the worldinng Z times.

What I have created is a dataset – that can be used – using multiple tools. The data is not school or person dependent; this is an increasing factor in employment as a teacher – much of the 21st Century IP can hardly be claimed by your employer.  If you are not doing this stuff AFTER school, outside the school filter – – then you are lagging education — but thats old news.

Having made this data, how could you use it to teach? – I know what I wanted to do – but shared data is shared experience these days.

What if several teachers create a lesson-wiki around the data-set. How can the first idea be made better?

By us thinking with the end in mind (a core value of project based learning), we can provide students with authentic data — we just have to ask interesting questions they can Google. In this case — purely looking at the data, and Google-Mapping it opens the door to many hours of critial thinking. If you have your own ideas – share! – Maybe the tweet will turn into a curricula.

This to me is where education has to be – – in the open, sharing data and ideas. Love to hear yours.